Tag Archives: Conveyor

Free Download: Conveyor – “Pushups”

11 Oct

Conveyor Push Ups

When we last heard from Brooklyn’s Conveyor, the esteemed Mr T.J. Masters was telling us about the songs that had the biggest influence on him as a teenager. On “Pushups”, the first new track we’ve heard from them since last year’s wonderful debut album and b-side to their forthcoming single, “Mammal Food”, he is telling us he’s been told he has ”a more than average penis size”. To be fair, the track is surrounded in so much fuzz and distortion, we could be wrong about that (we’re not) as it is not always easy to make out what the lyrics are.

We shouldn’t be surprised, for a band that loves to play with sound so much it makes sense that they would continue to evolve their music. The quintessential, light Conveyor folky sound is in there still, it’s just almost entirely enveloped by a cacophony of grinding interference.

It’s a bit like when you’d tune in an old black and white telly, turning the dial on the front, flicking and bending a loop antenna as you search for the right channel. Then somehow you manage to pick up two signals at once. The snowy screen giving glimpses of different programs while the pictures flicker and bleed into one another. It’s cathode ray music for the nostalgic, analogue sounds in a digital world, it’s (as you would expect from Conveyor) really good and we love it.

” Mammal Food / Pushups” is released on 10 December via Gold Robot Records (who are having a storming year it must be said) on limited edition (250 copies only) 7” gold vinyl and can be pre-ordered here.

“Pushups” can be downloaded for free for a limited time from the player below.


Read More about: Conveyor

Stalk Conveyor: Website / Bandcamp / Facebook / Twitter

Review: Little Tybee – For Distant Viewing

10 Apr

Little Tybee

From the moment the violin swept in on the title track of Little Tybee’s third album, For Distant Viewing, we knew it was something we were about to fall in love with. Like label mates, Conveyor, the Little Tybee crew have a clear and rousing enthusiasm for sound, how it moves and how it works, though their approach is perhaps a little more conventional than the Brooklynites. Elements of folk, pop, country, jazz and even some bossa nova all marble and swirl as one across the 11 tracks of this hook-laden album.

After opening with some delightful, occasional tropical sounding, jazzy folk sounds, we are treated to four minutes of swooshing instrumentalism, laced with gentle prog-rock sensibilities on “Fantastic Planet”. “Herman” drips with aquatic, almost sonar style elements that complement the rich string orchestration before, seemingly out of no-where, dropping in a surprising moment of grinding reverb. It is as unexpected as it is perfect, but it remains the only fleeting moment of rough with the otherwise very smooth.

For Distant Viewing inculcates a care free attitude in its listener. Soothing, heavenly strings entwine with Brock Scott’s rich and slightly sweet vocals as they lick flame like around the rat-a-tat of percussion and the light twang of guitar. It feels fresh at every listen, as if it has just been conceived, improvised, jammed. It is an album that will make you smile, make you sway and hell, maybe even kick off your shoes and have a little shuffle.

Named after an island off the coast of Savannah, Georgia, the music of Little Tybee has a sun kissed feel, not bleached out and surf swept, but bright and breezy. Part Vampire Weekend, part Simon and Garfunkel, perhaps even part Juan Zelada (for they have his charm in their song writing), it is like a glorious summer’s day, it is to be revelled in.

’For Distant Viewing’ is out now on Paper Garden Records and can be ordered, along with other Little Tybee goodies, here.



Stalk Little Tybee: Website / Facebook / Twitter

Tracks Of My Teens: #5 – Conveyor

26 Mar

Tracks Of My Teens

It has only been going a few weeks but already we have had some cracking contributions from some amazing artists to our Tracks Of My Teens feature. We are ever grateful for the willingness of these lovely people to offer up such intimate details and secrets of their youth and how music affected them. This week we get to feature another one of our favourite acts, and friends of the Blog, Conveyor. As we have supported them, Conveyor have supported us and we love them for it.

Not only did they give us a track by track insight to their masterful debut album (which featured in our Top 10 albums of 2012), but they also kindly provided the prize for our very first competition. Now, they have agreed to let us look deep into their past, well the past of T. J. Masters at least, and find out what music made him tick as a younger man in our latest Tracks Of My Teens.

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2012 Albums of the Year: Part Two #10 – #6

14 Dec

2012 Albums of the Year 10 to 6

Here we are again, on an album countdown extravaganza. It’s part two of our three-part look at our 15 favourite albums of the year. Today we will be revealing who took the number 10 – 6 spots (numbers 15 – 11 are here).

As we mentioned before, this is a list of favourites and reflects our somewhat eclectic tastes only. No science or voting was used to determine the order, just simple listening and enjoying.

Let’s crack on with numbers 10 – 6.

10. Conveyor – Conveyor

Conveyor

It’s clear thatConveyor love sound and they love to take and manipulate it; bending, shaping and twisting it until it feels just right. On first listen of their eponymous debut album it may appear that some are quickly discarded so they may play with another, veering off on a sonic tangent heading for who knows where. Listen again and you’ll not only wonder how they could have gone anywhere else, but you’ll hear the bubbling undercurrent of that which they left behind, echoing through the hills and valleys of this new soundscape. On Conveyor, sound begets sound. This is not a difficult album to enjoy; loving it is easy to do. Choruses are as catchy as a childhood virus and just as difficult to shake; “Short Hair” in particular is immune to vaccination and will live within your head for weeks. As will “Mom Talk”; we never thought we would be singing along with lyrics like “Hey Mom,/Hey Mom/Hey Mom/Hey Mom/Hey Mom/Hey Mom/What do you want to talk about today?” but we do each and every time the album is on. Conveyor is an album full of intricate and complex sounds that feel so simple and inviting, playful yet intense.


Buy it from: Conveyor

9. She Makes War – Little Battles

Little Battles

On her second album, Little Battles (and technically her second album on this list after her appearance as part of The Penelopes) Laura Kidd, aka She Makes War deals with the struggles and turmoils faced across life’s turbulent journey. Her beguiling, almost choral vocals are often looped to create light harmonies that sit atop layers and layers of sound. Her dark around the edges pop music is complemented with smooth, almost a cappella ballads which nestle amongst the solemn and the upbeat. Warm melodic harp sounds give way to cold and forceful staccato drum beats. Tonally the record flits from steel like assurance to crystal fragility, raw and edgy to tender and soft. It is an album we have come back to time and time again this year and one that never fails to capture and entice us.


Buy it from: She Makes War

8. 2:54 – 2:54

2.54

It has to be said, nostalgia has played a pretty big part in our adulation for the debut album by 2:54. The two Thurlow sisters, Hannah and Colette, have managed to reach deep inside us and flick the switch marked ‘early teens, getting properly excited by music for the first time’. Growing up in the early nineties with indie in the middle of a peak period makes us instantly predisposed to loving an album that is full of reminisces, not least Collette’s Toni Halliday-esque vocals that swoop over the dark and stormy guitar lines. That is not to say that nostalgia is the only reason we love the album, not at all. It’s just a great record, full of songs that swell into darkness and break into light, though mostly it’s about the dark. The neo-gothic sound that is growing in popularity is given additional beauty here by the sense of space and serenity contained within. It would be worthy of a place on our end of year list even if it didn’t remind us of our youth, but it does so it gets to go even higher.


Buy it from: iTunes

7. Toy – Toy

toy

Toy is an album that quickens the heart with excitement. The psychedelic proggy guitars are all hazy wavy wonderful, lifting you up on a swirling mass of krautrock indie. It’s a kaleidoscope of sound that cascades into your ears from all angles. The seven minutes-plus “Dead and Gone” is a prime example of how the sound builds and drops, swirls, spins, discombobulates and puts you back together again. Evidently Toy recorded their self-titled debut in a studio besieged with smoke machines and lasers to recreate the magic of their live shows, perhaps more bands should do the same if the results are always as exciting as this.


Buy it from: Toy

6. Roman Ruins – Homebuilding

roman ruins

If someone had told you that the guy who drums for Beach House on tour would release an album of his own, that it would be brilliant and even better than the Beach House album released that same year, you would probably have told them to get some sleep as they were obviously overworked and talking crazy. That is exactly what has happened though with Graham Hill’s (aka Roman Ruins) debut album, Homebuilding. It was largely written while Hill was on tour with his pregnant girlfriend left behind and the result is an album of rare beauty about growing a family and home. Delicate ambient sounds blend into soft 80s electro beats while the vocals gently rock you as if a babe in arms. More than any other, Homebuilding is designed to be experienced as an album in its entirety rather than as a collection of tracks. The narrative thread is woven throughout and the vinyl (which is stunning) has even been cut with no gaps so you can listen to it as one continuous piece of music. It is simply gorgeous.


Buy it from: Roman Ruins

We’ve hit number 6 in our countdown, come back tomorrow to find out which albums made it into our Top 5.

In Review: Conveyor – Conveyor

16 Jul

Conveyor is a band. We know this because their website says so, but frankly, that’s where conventional classification starts and stops. Born in Florida but now residing in the musical hotbed of Brooklyn, these four guys (Timothy John Masters, Evan Michael Garfield, G Alan Busch Jr and Michael Ryan Pedron) are playing with music like no-one else at the moment.

Following last year’s debut EP, the excellent Sun Ray, could have proved tricky for some, but Conveyor more than matches its shorter, elder brother, Interestingly, the band chose to write much of the album whilst recording rather than go in with their songs almost fully formed and ready. It’s an approach that clearly works, allowing them to capture ideas and follow their evolution. The album feels not only organic and cohesive as a result, but alive, tentacles of pop melodies, tribal drums, harmonies and layer upon layer of sumptuous noise creeping out, feeling its way into your soul.

It’s clear that these guys love sound; that might appear to be a flippant comment but it’s a quality that must not be dismissed lightly. Throughout the album, they take and manipulate sound, bending, shaping and twisting it until it feels just right. On first listen it may appear that these sounds are quickly discarded so they may play with another, veering off on a sonic tangent heading for who knows where. Listen again and you’ll not only wonder how they could have gone anywhere else, but you’ll hear the bubbling undercurrent of that which they left behind, echoing through the hills and valleys of this new soundscape. On Conveyor, sound begets sound.

This is perfectly encapsulated within the sublime “Right Sleep”, which itself moves through at least three distinct phases. Seamlessly blending from infectious indie pop to near a capella vocal harmonies and on to a dramatic, vibrating instrumental, all of which is immediately followed by the mariachi-esque “Mom Talk”. Sounds bonkers right? It totally works.

If all that feels a bit too experimental, arty and off-putting for you, fear not. This is not a difficult album to enjoy, far from it, loving Conveyor is easy to do. Choruses are as catchy as a childhood virus and just as difficult to shake; “Short Hair” in particular is immune to vaccination and will live within your head for weeks. As will the aforementioned “Mom Talk”; we never thought we would be singing along with lyrics like “Hey Mom,/Hey Mom/Hey Mom/Hey Mom/Hey Mom/Hey Mom/What do you want to talk about today?” but we do each and every time the album is on.

It would be easy to dismiss these two tracks as being out of keeping with the remainder of the record but in actuality they are very much an extension of this sonic embrace. Throughout Conveyor disparate patterns of sound and light are forged and the vocals are an essential element. Here, you can imagine them around a fire on a beach, singing and entertaining, elsewhere, on “Reach”, “Mukraker” and “All” for example, they are another aspect of the sound, layer upon multi-faceted layer intertwine, pitch and sprawl like a barbershop-quartet on acid.

Conveyor is a bold and confident debut album from a band that isn’t afraid to let the music lead them. The sounds are intricate and complex yet feel so simple and inviting, playful yet intense. It’s quite an achievement from a band so young and one that many other bands would not have had either the inclination or conviction to attempt, but as we know, Conveyor is not like other bands.

Conveyor is out tomorrow (17 July) via Paper Garden records. You can pre-order the album here on clear vinyl, CD or digitally.

Stalk Conveyor
Website / Bandcamp / Facebook / Twitter

Read More
In Their Own Words: Conveyor on Conveyor / Listen: New Conveyor Single – “Mane” / Watch/Listen: Conveyor – “Right Sleep” / Listen: Conveyor preview new single, “Mukraker” / EPs Of The Year

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